Do viruses have different genomes?

The vast majority of viruses have RNA genomes. Plant viruses tend to have single-stranded RNA genomes and bacteriophages tend to have double-stranded DNA genomes. Viral genomes are circular, as in the polyomaviruses, or linear, as in the adenoviruses.

Do viruses have identical genomes?

Viral genomes consist of DNA or RNA only, never both. DNA and RNA molecules can be double stranded or single stranded, linear or circular (Fig. 1.6), segmented (composed of multiple pieces of nucleic acid) or nonsegmented.

How do viral genomes differ?

Although viruses are generally the smallest genomes, as a collection of biological genomes they exhibit the greatest variation. The major difference is that some of the genomes are DNA whereas others are RNA. In addition, both DNA and RNA genomes can be either double- or single-stranded (ds or ss).

Do viruses have homeostasis?

Viruses have no way to control their internal environment and they do not maintain their own homeostasis.

Which viruses have segmented genomes?

Among viruses that infect vertebrates, those that carry segmented genomes belong to the Arenaviridae, Birnaviridae, Bunyavirales, Orthomyxoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, and Reoviridae. Reassortment has been documented to occur in nature for each of these viral taxa [1–6].

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What are viral genomes?

Viral genomes are very diverse, since they can be DNA or RNA, single- or double-stranded, linear or circular, and vary in length and in the number of DNA or RNA molecules. The viral replication process begins when a virus infects its host by attaching to the host cell and penetrating the cell wall or membrane.

What are four characteristics of viral genomes that may vary among viruses?

Viral genomes may vary in the type of genetic material (DNA or RNA) and its organization (single- or double-stranded, linear or circular, and segmented or non-segmented). In some viruses, additional proteins needed for replication are associated directly with the genome or contained within the viral capsid.

Why do viruses have a small genome?

Small genome size is perfectly suited to virus replication, in which each infected host cell produces many copies of the viral genes from a single template. Such exponential replication places a premium on small genome size: the smaller the genome, the faster it can replicate.

Are viruses organized?

In general, viruses are entirely composed of a single strand of genetic information encased within a protein capsule. Viruses lack most of the internal structure and machinery which characterize ‘life’, including the biosynthetic machinery that is necessary for reproduction.

Why do viruses not have homeostasis?

Viruses do not maintain their own homeostasis, only living things do. They are not able to control their internal environment. Viruses cannot be thought of as living because they lack the metabolic repertoire to reproduce without a host cell.

Do viruses contain DNA and RNA?

​Virus. A virus is a small collection of genetic code, either DNA or RNA, surrounded by a protein coat. A virus cannot replicate alone. Viruses must infect cells and use components of the host cell to make copies of themselves.

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Which virus has smallest genome?

The smallest viruses in terms of genome size are single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses. Perhaps the most famous is the bacteriophage Phi-X174 with a genome size of 5386 nucleotides. However, some ssDNA viruses can be even smaller.

Why do viruses have different base ratios?

The base composition is unequal, so it must be single stranded. A has a higher melting temperature. The triple hydrogen bonds between G and C are harder to break, so fragments with higher GC content will have a higher melting temperature.

What does it mean when a virus has a segmented genome?

A viral genome fragmented into two or more nucleic acid molecules. For example, the alfalfa mosaic virus has four different RNA segments, each packaged in a different virion.