Best answer: What does the Hardy Weinberg equilibrium describe?

The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium is a principle stating that the genetic variation in a population will remain constant from one generation to the next in the absence of disturbing factors. … For instance, mutations disrupt the equilibrium of allele frequencies by introducing new alleles into a population.

What does Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium indicate?

When a population is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for a gene, it is not evolving, and allele frequencies will stay the same across generations. There are five basic Hardy-Weinberg assumptions: no mutation, random mating, no gene flow, infinite population size, and no selection.

What is the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium used to describe quizlet?

What is the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium used to describe? The allele frequencies for genes of interest in a large population not subject to evolutionary pressure.

What are the 5 principles of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

The conditions to maintain the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium are: no mutation, no gene flow, large population size, random mating, and no natural selection. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium can be disrupted by deviations from any of its five main underlying conditions.

Why is Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium important for understanding evolution?

The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium principle describes the unchanging frequency of alleles and genotypes in a stable, idealized population. … In the absence of these evolutionary forces, the population would reach an equilibrium in one generation and maintain that equilibrium over successive generations.

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Why is Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium important quizlet?

What is the significance of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium? The significance of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium is that there in no evolution and no change in allele frequency. Populations in nature do not meet the conditions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, as all biological populations evolve.

What was the purpose of Hardy and Weinberg’s work?

Hardy Weinberg’s work shows that the percentage of alleles in genepool will remain in equilibrium when there is no new mutation and evolutionary forces are not working.

Is it in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

To know if a population is in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium scientists have to observe at least two generations. If the allele frequencies are the same for both generations then the population is in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium.

Which statement best describes the Hardy-Weinberg principle?

Correct answer:

Explanation: By definition, the Hardy-Weinberg principle states that genotype and allele frequencies will remain constant throughout generations. In order for equilibrium to occur, there must be a large, randomly mating population with no selection, genetic drift, migration, or mutation.

What are the five evolutionary mechanisms give a brief description of each?

There are five key mechanisms that cause a population, a group of interacting organisms of a single species, to exhibit a change in allele frequency from one generation to the next. These are evolution by: mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, non-random mating, and natural selection (previously discussed here).