How do you explain the Hardy Weinberg equation?

The Hardy-Weinberg equation used to determine genotype frequencies is: p2 + 2pq + q2 = 1. Where ‘p2’ represents the frequency of the homozygous dominant genotype (AA), ‘2pq’ the frequency of the heterozygous genotype (Aa) and ‘q2’ the frequency of the homozygous recessive genotype (aa).

What does the Hardy-Weinberg equation tell us?

The Hardy-Weinberg equation is a mathematical equation that can be used to calculate the genetic variation of a population at equilibrium. In 1908, G. H. … If the p and q allele frequencies are known, then the frequencies of the three genotypes may be calculated using the Hardy-Weinberg equation.

What is the Hardy-Weinberg principle and why is it important?

The Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is an important fundamental principal of population genetics, which states that “genotype frequencies in a population remain constant between generations in the absence of disturbance by outside factors” (Edwards, 2008).

What are the 5 conditions of the Hardy Weinberg principle?

The conditions to maintain the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium are: no mutation, no gene flow, large population size, random mating, and no natural selection. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium can be disrupted by deviations from any of its five main underlying conditions.

What is Hardy Weinberg equation is it possible in the real world?

The HW law essentially states that if no evolution is occurring, then an equilibrium of allele frequencies will remain in effect in each succeeding generation of sexually reproducing individuals. Actually, the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium cannot exist in real life.

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How does Hardy-Weinberg calculate allele frequency?

To calculate the allelic frequencies we simply divide the number of S or F alleles by the total number of alleles: 94/128 = 0.734 = p = frequency of the S allele, and 34/128 = 0.266 = q = frequency of the F allele.

Why is Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium important for understanding evolution?

The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium principle describes the unchanging frequency of alleles and genotypes in a stable, idealized population. … In the absence of these evolutionary forces, the population would reach an equilibrium in one generation and maintain that equilibrium over successive generations.

Which statement best describes the Hardy-Weinberg principle?

Correct answer:

Explanation: By definition, the Hardy-Weinberg principle states that genotype and allele frequencies will remain constant throughout generations. In order for equilibrium to occur, there must be a large, randomly mating population with no selection, genetic drift, migration, or mutation.